Keynotes


1


DESIGN RESEARCH IN, WITH AND FOR COMPANIES: HOW TO JOINTLY SHAPE INNOVATIONS TO CREATE BENEFIT FOR SOCIETY


Speaker: Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Dr. h. c. Albert Albers, University of Karlsruhe

Biographical Sketch:
Albert Albers Professor Albert Albers, head of the IPEK - Institute of Product Engineering at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), has been researching processes, methods and tools of product generation engineering for more than 20 years. As part of the keynote, he evaluates current developments in design research in a critical and constructive manner. He points out that excellent research, economic benefits and social added value are not mutually exclusive but require each other. Using current case studies, he shows ways in which the collaboration between design research, companies and civil society can be put into practice in concrete terms so that everyone involved can work together successfully.

Abstract:
Mobility, urbanisation and globalisation, but also world food and health. All major issues of the future have one thing in common: Civil society is increasingly demanding technical solutions to solve its problems, rather than social or moral ones. Increased mobility needs, for example, cannot be met by appeals to reduce mobility demands, but only with technically intelligent and ecologically sustainable mobility concepts. The consequence of this is that on the one hand, the importance and influence of engineers and on the other hand, their social responsibility has grown and will continue to grow.
Against this backdrop, the orientation and self-image of the design research community is also changing more and more: In many cases, collaboration between design researchers, companies and civil society is intensifying. This development is very welcome. However, there is still great untapped potential for cooperation, which is necessary, because only this way real-world-problems can be solved.

2


PSYCHOLOGY OF DESIGN: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY FIELD OF PERCEPTION, EMO-COGNITIVE PROCESSING AND THE CHARACTERISTICS OF DESIGN


Speaker: Claus-Christian Carbon, University of Bamberg; Forschungsgruppe EPÆG (Ergonomics, Psychological Æsthetics, Gestalt); Bamberg Graduate School of Affective and Cognitive Sciences (BaGrACS), Bamberg, Germany

Biographical Sketch:
Christian Carbon Christian Carbon studied Psychology (Dipl.-Psych.), followed by Philosophy (M.A.), both at University of Trier, Germany. After receiving his PhD from the Freie Universität Berlin and his “Habilitation” at the University of Vienna, Austria, he worked at the University of Technology Delft, Netherlands and the University of Bamberg, Germany, where he currently holds a full professorship leading the Department of General Psychology and Methodology and the “Forschungsgruppe EPAEG”—a research group devoted to enhancing the knowledge, methodology and enthusiasm in the fields of cognitive ergonomics, psychological aesthetics and design evaluation (see www.experimental-psychology.com and www.epaeg.de for more details). He is editor-in-chief of the scientific journal Art & Perception, section editor of Perception and i-Perception, Associate Editor of Frontiers in Psychology and Frontiers in Neuroscience and a member of the Editorial Boards of Advances in Cognitive Psychology, Psihologija, Open Psychology and Musicae Scientiae.

Abstract:
When we talk about design, most discussions will circulate around the physical objects of design, and subsequently the invention, development, production and marketing of design objects. Corresponding research areas have been developed to address these topics. While most approaches do indeed also cover the side of human interaction, a systematic way of understanding human perception and emo-cognitive processing when attending to design objects is still lacking. Under the umbrella term “psychology of design” I will introduce, demonstrate and explain the power of these processes in modulating the appreciation, acceptance and usage of design goods. This includes top-down-processes such as framing, expectation, knowledge, habituation or Gestalt qualities overwriting mere physical design properties, but also Zeitgeist-dependent processing further modulating the interpretation, value and function of design. In extreme cases, such psychological effects decide whether one and the same physical design is aesthetically appreciated or rejected in the end. The psychology of design has a tremendous influence on the success and sustainability of design, especially because it intentionally uses associations with design characteristics in a multimodal way to induce certain psychological properties which are crucial for purchase and maintaining decisions later on. The talk is based on fundamental psychological theories and empirical evidences which are linked to applied examples from the world of art and design.

3


A NEW DESIGN VISION: COGNITIVE DRIVEN DESIGN


Speaker: Prof. Alex Duffy, University of Strataclyde

Biographical Sketch:
Alex Duffy Alex Duffy is Professor of Systems Design and currently Head of Department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management, at the University of Strathclyde. He was previously the Vice-Dean of Research in the Faculty of Engineering and a past Vice President and President of the Design Society, an international body encompassing all aspects and disciplines of design. He is the editor of the Journal of Engineering Design, an Associate Editor of Design Science, a Strategic Advisory Board member for the International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation, and on the editorial boards of the journals of Artificial Intelligence in Engineering Design Analysis and Manufacture, the International Journal of Engineering Management and Economics, and Research in Engineering Design.

Abstract:
Currently, both commercial and state-of-the-art Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems are limited in how intuitive and conducive they are to the engineering design process. They are continually advancing but in an incremental fashion and by adapting to established design processes. Professor Alex Duffy currently leads a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from the University of Strathclyde, Ulster University, and University College London, adopting a radically different perspective on design. In this keynote, he will present a new vision for design creativity. Using brain imaging and cognitive psychology techniques, this vision seeks to open up possibilities for a new generation of design tools, surpassing the traditional CAD approach of mouse and keyboard interaction through a scientific understanding of the cognitive and neural processes underlying creative design activities.
Mapping the cognitive and neural basis of design is a complex, multi-faceted challenge that requires the integration of design, psychology, and neuroscience research. Professor Duffy will discuss state of the art methods for measuring cognitive and neural processing in design, and present findings from a recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of creative ideation involving professional designers. He will outline the potential implications of the work for design research and practice, as well as key challenges for advancing cognitive design science.

4


BUILDING A DESIGN COMMUNITY: SCIENCE, RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND PRACTICE


Speaker: Panos Y. Papalambros, University of Michigan

Biographical Sketch:
Panos Y. Papalambros Panos Y. Papalambros is the James B. Angell Distinguished University Professor and the Donald C. Graham Professor of Engineering at the University of Michigan with appointments in Mechanical Engineering, Architecture and Urban Planning, Art and Design, and Integrative Systems & Design where he serves as chair. His pedagogical and research interests include design science and optimization, with applications to sustainable design of products, automotive systems, such as hybrid and electric vehicles; design of complex engineered systems; and architectural design. With D. J. Wilde, he co-authored the textbook Principles of Optimal Design (3d Ed., 2017). He is past chief editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design and currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Design Science journal and as President of the Design Society.

Abstract:
Design appears in all aspects of human endeavor and has many stakeholders with diverse viewpoints. Diversity can mean division but there is unity in our common recognition that design is how humans change the world. Design Science studies the creation of artifacts and their embedding in our physical, psychological, economic, social and digital environment. Design science research aims to deepen our understanding of wicked problems in a technology-driven society and to contribute to their positive resolution. Design education is how we propagate such knowledge. Design practice informs, motivates, and realizes the benefits of this knowledge. We discuss some examples of design science research, education, and scholarly communication across disciplines; and we explore avenues for building a broader design community beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries.

5


FROM TECHNICAL DRAWING TO VIRTUAL PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: HOW TO REORGANIZE THE PROCESSES ACCORDING TO THE AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGIES


Speaker: Mauro Faccin - EUROMED Director, 3DS Value Solution Business Development Executive | Academia & Education – Dassault Systèmes

Biographical Sketch:
Mauro Faccin Mauro Faccin is the EUROMED Director, 3DS Value Solution Business Development Executive at Dassault Systemes. His career started in 1979 as Mechanical Designer using the first CAD Workstation. He covered different position in particular as Designer, Business Process analyst, IT architect, Project Manager , Service Director and finally Business Development Director. He has over 30 year of experience in requirements analysis and IT tools definition in order to support the Product Development Process from CAD to Digital Manufacturing. His main expertise is Digital Manufacturing where he defines different solutions to manage the Production Processes and new work methodologies in order to satisfy customers’ requirements. He managed many PLM systems implementation in different sectors including Automotive, Aerospace, Industry Equipment, Heavy transportation, Shipbuilding, Consumer Packaged Goods and Consumer Goods.

Abstract:
Starting from the technical drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, that were the direct expression of the design intents, we arrive to what, today, we call virtual twin, which is the exact virtual replication of a physical object including the behaviours. After many years, the purpose of designing is the same: communicating the aesthetical, functional, economical, and socio-political dimensions of an idea. The major changes have been developed in terms of technologies that support the design process. Actually, the acceleration and continuous emergence of innovative technologies have changed and still are influencing the way of doing design. However, technologies are just tools, tools that have been developed for supporting specific activities and improving design performances. Nowadays many different technologies are available thanks to visionary people and forerunners that based on their needs had the courage to innovate their way of doing. The multi-body simulation, the connected PLM, the virtual twin, AR/VR they are just examples of how the design processes are evolving beyond mere modelling products. The main question now is no longer about the design accuracy, but how technologies are adopted. The challenge now is to rethink completely the processes according to the available technologies proposing new design models that can leverage the digital continuity in the virtual product development.

  • designsociety.org
  • fsb.unizg.hr
  • unizg.hr
  • cadlab
  • perfectmeetings